A Quest for Respect with the Grouchy Ladybug

FCAT Connections

 

FCAT Test Item and Performance Task Specifications (2001)

 

 

FCAT activities components addressed in this lesson are:

 

FCAT Benchmark Assessed:

Benchmark LA.A.1.1.1: The student predicts what a passage is about based on its title and illustrations

Benchmark LA.A.1.1.4: The student increases comprehension by rereading, retelling, and discussion.

Benchmark LA.A.2.1.1: The student determines the main idea or essential message from text and identifies supporting information.

Benchmark LA.A.2.1.3: The student reads for information to use in performing a task and learning a new task.

Benchmark LA.A.2.1.4: The student knows strategies to use to discover whether information presented in a text is true, including asking others and checking another source.

Benchmark LA.B.1.1.2: The student drafts and revises simple sentences and passages, stories, letters, and simple explanations that

·         express ideas clearly;

·         show an awareness of topic and audience;

·         have a beginning, middle, and ending;

·         effectively use common words;

·         have supporting detail; and

·         are in legible printing.

Benchmark LA.B.1.1.3: The student produces final simple documents that have been edited for

·         correct spelling;

·         appropriate end punctuation;

·         correct capitalization of initial words, “I,” and names of people;

·         correct sentence structure; and

·         correct usage of age-appropriate verb/subject and noun/pronoun agreement.

Benchmark LA.B.2.1.1: The student writes questions and observations about familiar topics, stories, or new experiences.

Benchmark LA.B.2.1.3: The student uses basic computer skills for writing, such as basic word-processing techniques such as keying words, copying, cutting, and pasting; using e-mail; and accessing and using basic educational software for writing.

Benchmark LA.C.1.1.1: The student listens for a variety of informational purposes, including curiosity, pleasure, getting directions, performing tasks, solving problems, and following rules.

Benchmark LA.C.1.1.4: The student retells specific details of information heard, including sequence of events.

Benchmark LA.C.3.1.1: The student speaks clearly and at a volume audible in large- or small-group settings.

Benchmark MA.B.1.1.1: The student uses and describes basic measurement concepts including length, weight, digital and analog time, temperature, and capacity.

Benchmark SC.G.1.1.1: The student knows that environments have living and nonliving parts.

 

 

Bloom’s Taxonomy of Cognitive Objectives

 

Knowledge (learning the information):

What were some of the animals that the grouchy ladybug met during his day?

 

Comprehension (understanding the information):

What examples can you find that show that the ladybug was grouchy?

 

Application (using the information):

How would you use your knowledge of respect to help the grouchy ladybug make a friend?

 

Analysis (examining specific parts of the information):

Why was the grouchy ladybug trying to pick a fight with all the other animals?

 

Synthesis (doing something different with the information):

Can you predict what the outcome of the story might have been if the grouchy ladybug had not been grouchy?

 

Evaluation (judging the information):

How would you feel if someone treated you the way grouchy ladybug treated all the other animals?

 

 

Performance Task: Read, Think and Explain Questions

 

Generate passages and create short and/or extended response questions.

 

Listen to the following passage and respond to the following question(s):

Aphids are very small insects that can be quite the pest! They suck the juice from leaves, and then the leaves die.  Ladybugs eat aphids.

 

Short response:

Why would you want ladybugs in your garden?

 

FCAT Extension / Ideas for This Lesson

 

Art: Use flat rocks to paint and design a ladybug.

 

Writing: Have the children write a letter to the main character. They can express their feelings about the book and write how they felt about the ladybug’s behavior.

 

Math: Ladybugs have 6 legs.  How many legs will you have if you have 3 ladybugs? 5? How about 10?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Knowledge

Exhibit memory of previously learned material by recalling facts, terms, basic concepts and answers.

 

 

 

 

*       What is…?

*       Where is…?

*       How did ____ happen?

*       Why did…?

*       When did…?

*       How would you show…?

*       Who were the main…?

*       Which one….?

*       How is…?

*       When did ____ happen?

*       How would you explain…?

*       How would you describe…?

*       Can you recall…?

*       Can you select…?

*       Can you list the three…?

*       Who was…?

 

 

Comprehension

Solve problems to new situations by applying acquired knowledge, facts, techniques, and rules in a different way.

 

 

 

*        How would you use…?

*        What examples can you find to…?

*        How would you solve ____ using what you’ve learned…?

*        How would you organize _____ to show…?

*        How would you show your understanding of…?

*        What approach would you use to…?

*        How would you apply what you learned to develop…?

*        What other way would you plan to…?

*        What would result if…?

*        Can you make use of the facts to…?

*        What elements would you choose to change…?

*        What facts would you select to show…?

*       What questions would you ask in an interview with…?

 

 

 


 

Application

 

Solve problems to new situations by applying acquired knowledge, facts, techniques, and rules in a different way.

 

 

 

*       How would you use…?

*       What examples can you find to…?

*       How would you solve ____ using what you’ve learned…?

*       How would you organize _____ to show…?

*       How would you show your understanding of…?

*       What approach would you use to…?

*       How would you apply what you learned to develop…?

*       What other way would you plan to…?

*       What would result if…?

*       Can you make use of the facts to…?

*       What elements would you choose to change…?

*       What facts would you select to show…?

*       What questions would you ask in an interview with…?

 

 

 


 

Analysis

Examine and break information into parts by identifying motives or causes.  Make inferences and find evidence to support generalizations.

 

 

 

*       What are the parts or features of…?

*       How is _____ related to…?

*       Why do you think…?

*       What is the theme…?

*       What motive is there…?

*       Can you list the parts…?

*       What inference can you make…?

*       What conclusions can you draw…?

*       How would you classify…?

*       How would you categorize…?

*       Can you identify the different parts…?

*       What evidence can you find…?

*       What is the relationship between…?

*       Can you make a distinction between…?

*       What is the function of…?

 

 

 

 

Synthesis

 

Compile information together in a different way by combining elements in a new pattern or proposing alternative solutions.

 

 

 

*       What changes would you make to solve…?

*       How would you improve…?

*       What would happen if…?

*       Can you elaborate on the reason…?

*       Can you propose an alternative…?

*       What way would you design…?

*       What could be combined to improve (change)…?

*       How would you test…?

*       Can you formulate a theory for…?

*       Can you predict the outcome if…?

*       How would you estimate the results for…?

*       What facts can you compile…?

*       Can you construct a model that would change…?

*       Can you think of an original way for the…?

*     

 

 

Evaluation

Present and defend opinions by making judgments about information, validity of ideas or quality of work based on a set of criteria.

 

 

 

*         Do you agree with the actions…?  With the outcome…?

*         What is your opinion of…?

*       Can you assess the value or importance of…?

*       What would you recommend…?

*       How would you evaluate…?

*       What would you select…?

*       What judgment would you make about…?

*       How would you justify…?

*       Why was it better that…?

*       How would you prioritize the facts…?

*       How would you compare the ideas…?  People…?

*       How would you rate the…?

*       How would you prove…?  Disprove…?

*       Would it be better if…?